Estate Planning for Pets

Estate Planning for Pets

If you have a furry friend, you know your pet relies on you for every need. What would your pet do without you? Although pets are legally consideredDocumentsminutes01 to be property, to those of us who own pets, they are more like members of the family.  Just as you make preparations to care for the human members of your family after your passing, you need to think about how to look after your pets as well.

Here are some options that can help you ensure your pets are cared for if something happens to you:

Create A Pet Trust
Of all the options available, a Pet Trust is the most extensive. Creating a trust for your pet typically involves choosing a caregiver and a trustee who will receive assets after your death to care for your pets. Often times, the caregiver will be a trusted friend, relative, or animal professional. The trustee will use the assets to pay for the pet’s expenses and make sure your pet receives the proper treatment from the caregiver.

One of the advantages of a Pet Trust is that it will take effect if you become disabled or are no longer able to care for your pet in your home. When your Pet Trust is written, it is important to be as detailed as possible and to name all of the expenses you want to be covered by your trust.

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Being a Dog is Nosey Business!

Being a Dog is Nosey Business!

It’s not just something on the end of a very adorable face, it’s much, much more.  While the appearance of doggy noses may vary greatly, they all play very important roles for survival.  Whether it is long, short, black or pink, your dog’s nose tells him a lot about the world around him.

dog nose

Doggy noses are very important for communication.  While noses don’t actually speak, they do communicate. With a single sniff, noses interpret an entire story without words. They use chemical aromas to learn what a dog likes to eat, and identify gender and mood. By simply smelling, a dog can determine if a new friend is male or female, happy or aggressive, healthy or ill. Dogs get a general idea about each other with a quick sniff, but get more detailed information by getting up close and personal. That’s why some dogs sniff private parts of the anatomy!
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Canine Influenza Update

Canine Influenza Update

I’m sure many of you have heard about the ongoing outbreak of canine influenza in the midwest. This is a very scary situation and unfortunately many dogs have been affected.

Canine InfluenzaWe have not yet seen much of this disease in our area. A few years ago there was a small outbreak in Massachusetts and another in Vermont. There is an Influenza vaccine available for dogs and this is not something that we currently offer here at our practice.
I have never in my entire career seen a case of this disease and in choosing which vaccinations to recommend, we weigh risk vs. benefit. If at any point it is determined that there is a risk here of the strain of influenza that the vaccine protects against, we will reconsider.

That being said, one important point to know about the outbreak in the Midwest is that it is not the strain of Influenza against which the vaccine protects. The vaccine is against the H3N8 strain and the current outbreak is the H3N2 strain, previously only seen in Asia.
Infectious disease experts don’t know if the vaccine is protective at all against this current strain but understandably they are recommending that dogs in the Chicago area be vaccinated just in case there is some cross protection, if even to lessen the severity of the disease.

My recommendation would be to limit travel with your dogs if possible especially to areas that are currently affected.
Please let us know if you have any questions.

Dr. Jennifer Edwards
Ponemah Veterinary Hospital
http://www.Ponemahvet.com

What’s the Scoop on Doggy Diabetes?

What’s the Scoop on Doggy Diabetes?

Many of you have or know people who have had a pet with diabetes.  It is a serious condition but with dedication and care can often be well managed.  As always, feel free to call or email us if you have questions or are concerned that your pet may be diabetic.

What is diabetes mellitus?

Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas, a small but vital organ located neardiabetes dog the stomach. The pancreas has two significant types of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta cells, produces the hormone insulin. Insulin regulates the level of glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream and controls the delivery of glucose to the tissues of the body. In simple terms, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar.

The clinical signs of diabetes mellitus are related to elevated concentrations of blood glucose and the inability of the body to use glucose as an energy source. Read more